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Author(s):  
Bella Gertrude B. Alpasan ◽  

The purpose of this study was to assist the faculty of the Institute of Information and Computer Studies in securing their records and personal devices that were left at the office. This study made use of developmental-descriptive research. In software development, the Rapid Application Development (RAD) model was used. The system was developed using the n-tier architectural design. Because the developed system will be deployed in the IICS Building, the concerned faculty can be added as secondary users of the system so that they, along with the guard-on-duty, receive notification whenever there is motion detected during the night. A short message service (SMS) support is essential as a communication tool in notifying the room custodian and security guard-on-duty.


2021 ◽  
pp. 875647932110648
Author(s):  
Nicole Stigall-Weikle ◽  
Kevin D. Evans ◽  
Emily S. Patterson

Sonographers experience a high cognitive load in hospital-based care. High ambient noise and frequent noise-based interruptions include knocking on the room door, questions from others in the room or through communication technology, alarms, alerts from personal devices, and carts and people passing in the hallway. In addition, other providers turning on the overhead light is distracting for exams that need to be conducted in reduced lighting conditions. This article suggests strategies to improve working conditions for sonographers conducting exams on a patient in the hospital room. Our strategies emerge from human factors methods and principles, which derive from communication principles and theory. These strategies are organized by reducing noise-based and light-based interruptions in the hospital room and hallway, primarily through changes to the built environment and communication technology settings and reducing the use of speech during cognitively challenging time periods through training. Most of the strategies are low-cost and can be implemented within the current built environment and communication technology infrastructure. We anticipate that these strategies could enhance patient outcomes, increase patient satisfaction, improve sonographers’ job satisfaction, protect provider health, and increase procedural efficiency.


Author(s):  
Wanderson L Costa ◽  
Ariel L. C Portela ◽  
Rafael Lopes Gomes

Nowadays, urban environments are deploying smart environments (SEs) to evolve infrastructures, resources, and services. SEs are composed of a huge amount of heterogeneous devices, i.e., the SEs have both personal devices (smartphones, notebooks, tablets, etc) and Internet of Things (IoT) devices (sensors, actuators, and others). One of the existing problems of the SEs is the detection of Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks, due to the vulnerabilities of IoT devices. In this way, it is necessary to deploy solutions that can detect DDoS in SEs, dealing with issues like scalability, adaptability, and heterogeneity (distinct protocols, hardware capacity, and running applications). Within this context, this article presents an Intelligent System for DDoS detection in SEs, applying Machine Learning (ML), Fog, and Cloud computing approaches. Additionally, the article presents a study about the most important traffic features for detecting DDoS in SEs, as well as a traffic segmentation approach to improve the accuracy of the system. The experiments performed, using real network traffic, suggest that the proposed system reaches 99% of accuracy, while reduces the volume of data exchanged and the detection time.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
◽  
Piper Biswell

<p>This thesis explores how children engage with horror narratives in the digital era and how this engagement has changed over the last decade. The term ‘Horror narratives’ encompasses a wide range of genre-based storytelling from urban legends, to creepypastas, to images, YouTube videos, and internet forums. It is a broad form of story-sharing that transcends physical and digital mediums. I examine the relationship between the horror narratives, the individual child, and wider group engagement in real-life and on a digital platforms, and how this has changed over the last fifteen years. Over the past twenty years children’s access to personal devices and digital media has expanded rapidly. I ask whether oral tradition has been overtaken by digital horror narratives. What does story-sharing look like in a digital medium?   Part of this paper is looking at how children’s horror narrative repertoires develop and what stories are retained and disseminated among their peers. In my childhood era the predominant form of dissemination was oral story-sharing, but during my fieldwork with young scouts I learned that children engage in a variety of media for dissemination as they now have easier access to internet communities on their personal devices. I have compared popular oral urban legends from my childhood (Click Click Slide, Drip Drip, and “Johnny, I want my liver back”) to contemporary horror narratives children engage with both in real-life and in the digital medium. My thesis also explores the relationship between young adults in their early twenties and memories of these horror narratives from their childhood, and how these memories have been impacted by nostalgia and retroactive knowledge. The major question of this thesis is how has horror storytelling changed from my childhood fifteen years ago to present time, and what have new technologies contributed to this evolution in horror narration?</p>


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
◽  
Piper Biswell

<p>This thesis explores how children engage with horror narratives in the digital era and how this engagement has changed over the last decade. The term ‘Horror narratives’ encompasses a wide range of genre-based storytelling from urban legends, to creepypastas, to images, YouTube videos, and internet forums. It is a broad form of story-sharing that transcends physical and digital mediums. I examine the relationship between the horror narratives, the individual child, and wider group engagement in real-life and on a digital platforms, and how this has changed over the last fifteen years. Over the past twenty years children’s access to personal devices and digital media has expanded rapidly. I ask whether oral tradition has been overtaken by digital horror narratives. What does story-sharing look like in a digital medium?   Part of this paper is looking at how children’s horror narrative repertoires develop and what stories are retained and disseminated among their peers. In my childhood era the predominant form of dissemination was oral story-sharing, but during my fieldwork with young scouts I learned that children engage in a variety of media for dissemination as they now have easier access to internet communities on their personal devices. I have compared popular oral urban legends from my childhood (Click Click Slide, Drip Drip, and “Johnny, I want my liver back”) to contemporary horror narratives children engage with both in real-life and in the digital medium. My thesis also explores the relationship between young adults in their early twenties and memories of these horror narratives from their childhood, and how these memories have been impacted by nostalgia and retroactive knowledge. The major question of this thesis is how has horror storytelling changed from my childhood fifteen years ago to present time, and what have new technologies contributed to this evolution in horror narration?</p>


2021 ◽  
Vol 2 (4) ◽  
Author(s):  
D Engler ◽  
C Hanson ◽  
L Desteghe ◽  
G Boriani ◽  
S Z Diederichsen ◽  
...  

Abstract Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) screening has the potential to increase early detection and possibly reduce complications of AF. Guidelines recommend screening, but the most appropriate approaches are unknown. Purpose We aimed to explore the views of stakeholders across Europe about the opportunities and challenges of implementing four different AF screening scenarios. Method This qualitative study included 21 semi-structured interviews with healthcare professionals and regulators potentially involved in AF screening implementation in nine European countries. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Results Three themes evolved. 1) Current approaches to screening: there are no national AF screening programmes, with most AF detected in symptomatic patients. Patient-led screening exists via personal devices, creating screening inequity by the reach of screening programmes being limited to those who access healthcare services. 2) Feasibility of screening approaches: single time point opportunistic screening in primary care using single lead ECG devices was considered the most feasible approach and AF screening may be possible in previously unexplored settings such as dentists and podiatrists. Software algorithms may aid identification of patients suitable for screening and telehealth services have the potential to support diagnosis. However, there is a need for advocacy to encourage the use of telehealth to aid AF diagnosis, and training for screening familiarisation and troubleshooting. 3) Implementation requirements: sufficient evidence of benefit is required. National rather than pan-European screening processes must be developed due to different payment mechanisms and health service regulations. There is concern that the rapid spread of wearable devices for heart rate monitoring may increase workload due to false positives in low risk populations for AF. Data security and inclusivity for those without access to primary care or personal devices must be addressed. Conclusions There is an overall awareness of AF screening. Opportunistic screening appears to be most feasible across Europe. Challenges that need to be addressed concern health inequalities, identification of best target groups for screening, streamlined processes, the need for evidence of benefit, and a tailored approach adapted to national realities. Funding Acknowledgement Type of funding sources: Public grant(s) – EU funding. Main funding source(s): H2020 Screening Scenarios  Graphical abstract


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
◽  
Bede William Robertson

<p>The traditional post office is a confusing and lost character within our urban fabric . Once a central part of towns both rural and urban it is now ignored by the communities it once served, a stagnant figure as communities struggle to figure out what role it still holds. This shift in its role raises larger questions about the shift in the way we view and use communication to express identity. Present day communication is largely conducted over the internet, and we primarily do so through our personal devices. Yet this is not a stagnant shift, with modes of communication evolving and multiplying ever more rapidly. It is through this aspect of speed that begins to address the complexities of this shift.  Paul Virilio’s writings on dromology discuss the connections between communication, geography and the virtual world. It offers a framework through which this shift can be viewed, looking at how these ever increasing speeds lead to a collapse of distance both temporally and physically. This results in a geographic disconnect that erodes our ability to engage in place identity. Architecture offers a way that this shift towards a virtual identity can be re-spatialised and authenticated, acknowledging the fractured identities we now hold in geographic and virtual realities.  To address this dromological shift this thesis looks at aspects of authenticity and performativity within the post office, investigating how they might offer a way to explore the intersection between old modes of postal communication and new ways of communicating through our cellphones. Through these architectural interventions the new post office is found, one that grounds modern communication within the wider chronological narrative of the post office.</p>


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
◽  
Bede William Robertson

<p>The traditional post office is a confusing and lost character within our urban fabric . Once a central part of towns both rural and urban it is now ignored by the communities it once served, a stagnant figure as communities struggle to figure out what role it still holds. This shift in its role raises larger questions about the shift in the way we view and use communication to express identity. Present day communication is largely conducted over the internet, and we primarily do so through our personal devices. Yet this is not a stagnant shift, with modes of communication evolving and multiplying ever more rapidly. It is through this aspect of speed that begins to address the complexities of this shift.  Paul Virilio’s writings on dromology discuss the connections between communication, geography and the virtual world. It offers a framework through which this shift can be viewed, looking at how these ever increasing speeds lead to a collapse of distance both temporally and physically. This results in a geographic disconnect that erodes our ability to engage in place identity. Architecture offers a way that this shift towards a virtual identity can be re-spatialised and authenticated, acknowledging the fractured identities we now hold in geographic and virtual realities.  To address this dromological shift this thesis looks at aspects of authenticity and performativity within the post office, investigating how they might offer a way to explore the intersection between old modes of postal communication and new ways of communicating through our cellphones. Through these architectural interventions the new post office is found, one that grounds modern communication within the wider chronological narrative of the post office.</p>


Author(s):  
Aman Thukral ◽  
Kelsey Linsmeier ◽  
Brooks Fowler ◽  
Sanjay Bhardwaj

Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are used in pharmaceuticaltrials to obtain trends in health status. Companies commonly provision tabletand smartphone devices to collect PRO information. Alternatively, the BringYour Own Device (BYOD) model allows patients to leverage personal devices andis actively being explored as a solution.&nbsp; This article investigates thepotential benefits of BYOD and outlines a framework of considerations. Theframework addresses current challenges and proposes potential solutions toMeasurement Equivalence, Technical, and Operational concerns. BYOD has not yet beenimplemented on any studies for regulatory submission. Nonetheless, there isreason to believe the model will gain traction in the coming years. With theprovided framework, sponsors can assess whether the BYOD model is right for theconsidered study.


Author(s):  
Matti Vartiainen

“Telework” and “remote work” have both increased sharply in recent years during and after the pandemic. The basic difference between telework and remote work is that a teleworker uses personal electronic devices in addition to working physically remotely from a place other than an office or company premises, whereas remote work does not require visits to the main workplace or the use of electronic personal devices. “Mobile tele- and remote workers” use several other places in addition to home for working. “Digital online telework” is a global form of employment that uses online platforms to enable individuals, teams, and organizations to access other individuals or organizations to solve problems or to provide services in exchange for payment. Often tele- and remote workers cowork in virtual teams and projects. The prevalence of various types of tele- and remote working vary. Although there are conceptual challenges to operationalizing the concept, it is estimated that hundreds of millions—and possibly more—people today earn their living working at and from their home or other places using digital tools and platforms. In the future, it is expected that new hybrid modes of working will emerge enabled by digital technologies. These changes in working increase the complexity of job demands because of the increased variety of contextual job characteristics. The main benefits of these new ways of working are organizational flexibility and individual autonomy; at the same time, unclear social relations may increase feelings of isolation and challenge the work-life balance.


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