Family Living
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2021 ◽  
pp. 103237322110322
Author(s):  
Gina Rossi

In elaborating on accounting and work, this study focuses on the distinctive arena of the household to uncover details regarding how relationships with paid subordinates were managed in the eighteenth century. To delve more deeply into the topic, this article focuses on the case of Silvia Rabatta, a widow in a noble family living in Friuli (Italy). Drawing on primary archival sources, this study shows that Silvia managed work relationships with her subordinates like business relationships, instrumental in nature and based on contractual agreements. However, her emotional attachment and attention to the subordinates’ wellbeing were also evident in the accounting books and correspondence of this Friulian noblewoman.


Author(s):  
Wendy McInally ◽  
Carol Gray‐Brunton ◽  
Zoe Chouliara ◽  
Richard G. Kyle

2021 ◽  
pp. 0192513X2110223
Author(s):  
Julieta Palma

Previous research has mainly understood household extension as a family strategy to face economic deprivation, giving little attention to other factors affecting it. Using 2017 data from the National Socioeconomic Characterization Survey, this article evaluates the role played by economic and life-course factors in extended family living arrangements among women in family units in Chile ( n = 60,111). Results indicate that economic needs are an important driver for those seeking refuge in someone else’s home, but they are less important for those hosting other relatives within their household. Importantly, the likelihood of living in an extended household—and the position that family units occupy within the household (as head-families or subfamilies)—changes over the life span. Young women (15–34 years) are more likely to live in extended households as sub-families, while middle-aged women (45–64 years) tend to live in extended households as household heads, hosting young cohabiting couples, or lone mothers.


Author(s):  
Luque Rojas M.J. ◽  
Luque D.J. ◽  
Elósegui E. ◽  
Casquero D. ◽  
Ilizástigui del Portal L. ◽  
...  

The existence and family living with a sibling with a disability implies a dynamic and a structure with meaning to children and their circumstances. However, a sibling that accompanies, helps, or takes part in family life, usually is lower analysis compared with children with disabilities. The goal of this work is to analyze the behavior of children before siblings with disabilities. Following two children’s opinions in this context. It is intended to make some analysis about the children's behavior towards their sibling, and finally, seek reflection on the structure of family relationships.


2021 ◽  
Vol 11 (1) ◽  
Author(s):  
Álvaro Luna ◽  
Nicolás A. Lois ◽  
Sol Rodríguez-Martinez ◽  
Antonio Palma ◽  
Ana Sanz-Aguilar ◽  
...  

AbstractIn some vertebrate species, family units are typically formed when sexually mature individuals delay dispersal and independent breeding to remain as subordinates in a breeding group. This behaviour has been intensively studied in gregarious species but has also been described in non-social species where ecological and evolutionary drivers are less known. Here, we explore factors that favour delayed dispersal and family living and potential benefits associated with this strategy in a non-social, monogamous species (the burrowing owl, Athene cunicularia) occupying urban and rural habitats. Our results show that family units arise when first-year individuals, mainly males, delay their dispersal to stay in their natal nests with their parents. This delayed dispersal, while still uncommon, was more prevalent in urban (7%) than in rural (3%) habitats, and in areas with high conspecific density and productivity. Birds delaying dispersal contributed to the genetic pool of the offspring in 25% of the families analysed, but did not increase the productivity of the nests where they remained. However, their presence was related to an improvement in the body condition of chicks, which was ultimately linked to a slightly positive effect in offspring future survival probabilities. Finally, delayed dispersers were recruited as breeders in high-quality urban territories and closer to their natal nests than individuals dispersing during their first year of life. Thus, our results suggest that delaying dispersal may be mainly related to opportunities to inheriting a good quality territory, especially for males. Our study contributes to understanding the role played by habitat quality in promoting delayed dispersal and family living, not only in social but also non-social species, highlighting its impact in the ecology and evolution of animal populations.


2020 ◽  
Author(s):  
Mesut Günenç

<p>Jez Butterworth’s <i>The Ferryman</i> (2017) is a play about the Carney family living in 1980s Ireland during the period of the rebellion of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) and its efforts to get rid of British sovereignty in Northern Ireland, a period known as ‘the Troubles’. This paper focuses on Jez Butterworth, one of the most distinctive voices of the contemporary British theatre scene and a typical representative of the 1990s cultural trend, and his tragedy <i>The Ferryman</i>, which portrays the struggle and conflicts between Catholic nationalists and Protestant loyalists in Northern Ireland in the last decades of the twentieth century. The second major point of the study is that the power of the Irish Republican Party has a heavy impact on the play. The paper also discovers how Sean Carney and other members of his family both embody and apply the story of Eugene Simons and other members of ‘the Disappeared’. Like other young men, Seamus Carney became a victim during the Troubles and the campaign of political violence. The discovery of his body symbolizes how political violence created the Disappeared and shows that re-victimization and re-traumatisation continue in the aftermath of the Troubles.</p>


2020 ◽  
Author(s):  
Mesut Günenç

<p>Jez Butterworth’s <i>The Ferryman</i> (2017) is a play about the Carney family living in 1980s Ireland during the period of the rebellion of the Irish Republican Army (IRA) and its efforts to get rid of British sovereignty in Northern Ireland, a period known as ‘the Troubles’. This paper focuses on Jez Butterworth, one of the most distinctive voices of the contemporary British theatre scene and a typical representative of the 1990s cultural trend, and his tragedy <i>The Ferryman</i>, which portrays the struggle and conflicts between Catholic nationalists and Protestant loyalists in Northern Ireland in the last decades of the twentieth century. The second major point of the study is that the power of the Irish Republican Party has a heavy impact on the play. The paper also discovers how Sean Carney and other members of his family both embody and apply the story of Eugene Simons and other members of ‘the Disappeared’. Like other young men, Seamus Carney became a victim during the Troubles and the campaign of political violence. The discovery of his body symbolizes how political violence created the Disappeared and shows that re-victimization and re-traumatisation continue in the aftermath of the Troubles.</p>


Author(s):  
Yung-Chih Chen

Taiwan's small to the medium-sized traditional manufacturing industry is generally believed to have flourished in the 1970s due to the encouragement of the government to promote turning family living rooms into factories. With the hardworking attitude, these small factories were able to accumulate tiny good results and to converge into a significant force. Gradually, these family factories began to grow stronger, and they tried desperately to increase their productivity. They began to follow the model of standardization and mass production. However, did everything possible to reduce costs and to improve international competitiveness? In the study, we used Y Factory as an example to figure out their difficulties and achievements.


Author(s):  
Mark Glancy

Archie Leach was a poorly educated, working-class boy from a troubled family living in the backstreets of Bristol. Cary Grant was Hollywood’s most debonair film star—the embodiment of worldly sophistication. Cary Grant: The Making of a Hollywood Legend tells the incredible story of how the sad, neglected boy became the suave, glamorous star. The first biography to be based on Grant’s own personal papers, the book takes the reader on a fascinating journey from his difficult childhood through years of struggle in music hall and vaudeville, a hit-and-miss career in Broadway musicals, and three decades of film stardom during Hollywood’s golden age. For the first time, the bitter realities of Grant’s impoverished childhood are revealed, including his mother’s mental illness and his expulsion from school at the age of fourteen. New light is shed on his trailblazing path as a film star who defied the studio system and took control of his own career. His genius as an actor and a filmmaker is highlighted through identifying the crucial contributions he made to classic films such as Bringing Up Baby (1938), The Philadelphia Story (1940), Notorious (1946), An Affair to Remember (1957), North by Northwest (1959), Charade (1963) and Father Goose (1964). His own search for happiness and fulfilment, which led him to having his first child at the age of sixty-two and embarking on his fifth marriage at the age of seventy-seven—is explored with new candor and insight. Cary Grant: The Making of a Hollywood Legend is the definitive account of the professional and personal life of an unforgettable star.


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