Gender Based
Recently Published Documents


TOTAL DOCUMENTS

3925
(FIVE YEARS 2446)

H-INDEX

62
(FIVE YEARS 18)

2021 ◽  
Vol 11 ◽  
Author(s):  
Md Tipu Khan ◽  
Bharat Prajapati ◽  
Simran Lakhina ◽  
Mridula Sharma ◽  
Sachin Prajapati ◽  
...  

Differences in the incidence and outcome of glioma between males and females are well known, being more striking for glioblastoma (GB) than low-grade glioma (LGG). The extensive and well-annotated data in publicly available databases enable us to analyze the molecular basis of these differences at a global level. Here, we have analyzed The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and Chinese Glioma Genome Atlas (CGGA) databases to identify molecular indicators for these gender-based differences by different methods. Based on the nature of data available/accessible, the transcriptomic profile was studied in TCGA by using DeSeq2 and in CGGA by T-test, after correction based. Only IDH1 wild-type tumors were studied in CGGA. Using weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA), network analysis was done, followed by the assessment of modular differential connectivity. Differentially affected signaling pathways were identified. The gender-based effects of differentially expressed genes on survival were determined. DNA methylation was studied as an indicator of gender-based epigenetic differences. The results clearly showed gender-based differences in both GB and LGG, whatever method or database was used. While there were differences in the results obtained between databases and methods used, some major signaling pathways such as Wnt signaling and pathways involved in immune processes and the adaptive immune response were common to different assessments. There was also a differential gender-based influence of several genes on survival. Also, the autosomal genes NOX, FRG1BP, and AL354714.2 and X-linked genes such as PUDP, KDM6A, DDX3X, and SYAP1 had differential DNA methylation and expression profile in male and female GB, while for LGG, these included autosomal genes such as CNIH3 and ANKRD11 and X-linked genes such as KDM6A, MAOB, and EIF2S3. Some, such as FGF13 and DDX3X, have earlier been shown to have a role in tumor behavior, though their dimorphic effects in males and females have not been identified. Our study thus identifies several crucial differences between male and female glioma, which could be validated further. It also highlights that molecular studies without consideration of gender can obscure critical elements of biology and emphasizes the importance of parallel but separate analyses of male and female glioma.


2021 ◽  
pp. 104973232110413
Author(s):  
Ebru Cayir ◽  
Mindi Spencer ◽  
Deborah Billings ◽  
DeAnne K. Hilfinger Messias ◽  
Alyssa Robillard

Non-profit organizations that address gender-based violence must create diverse, inclusive, and equitable workplaces for advocates so that they can adequately serve diverse survivors. Despite recent efforts, differential treatment and high turnover among minority advocates continue. Further strategies to eliminate discriminative organizational practices are needed. We interviewed 25 advocates employed by non-profit organizations in a Southeastern state to examine how race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality shape their work experiences. Guided by constructivist grounded theory and intersectionality, data analysis yielded four major themes that covered white dominance in advocacy, essentialized womanhood and heteronormativity, serving communities of color, working in the Deep South. Patriarchal values, religious norms, and gender roles influenced how advocates’ work was received by the communities. Racial/ethnic minority, and sexual and/or gender minority advocates faced discrimination, tokenism, and negative stereotypes. Transforming organizational climate and policies is necessary to support minority advocates’ work engagement and ability to serve marginalized communities.


2021 ◽  
pp. 107780122110309
Author(s):  
Jenny Phillimore ◽  
Sandra Pertek ◽  
Selin Akyuz ◽  
Hoayda Darkal ◽  
Jeanine Hourani ◽  
...  

Adopting a structural violence approach, this article explores, with survivors and practitioners, how early coronavirus disease-2019 pandemic conditions affected forced migrant sexual and gender-based violence survivors’ lives. Introducing a new analytical framework combining violent abandonment, slow violence, and violent uncertainty, we show how interacting forms of structural violence exacerbated by pandemic conditions intensified existing inequalities. Abandonment of survivors by the state increased precarity, making everyday survival more difficult, and intensified prepandemic slow violence, while increased uncertainty heightened survivors’ psychological distress. Structural violence experienced during the pandemic can be conceptualized as part of the continuum of violence against forced migrants, which generates gendered harm.


2021 ◽  
Vol 11 (4) ◽  
pp. 5441-5453
Author(s):  
K. Shanthi ◽  
Saritha Nittala

Human Rights are inalienable. As stated by the UN Charter, gender equality is the fundamental right of every human being. As stated by the Vienna Declaration, women's and girls' rights are inalienable, integral, and form an indivisible part of universal human rights. The entire world has raised its voice and has reached its peak in the 1990s. India, precariously being a male-dominated society, has always looked down on a woman as a vulnerable group, to be dependent, owing to certain sociological, political, and biological conditions. Gender-based violence, as stated by the UN declaration, includes violence against women. It brings within it the broader framework of gender-based discrimination. In every nook and corner, we see and hear about violence against a girl child/ women irrespective of their age, caste, creed, social and economic conditions, and the happenings that shackle all humanity with ignominy. These instances profligately eliminate their basic human rights. Intimate Partner Violence is such a kind of violence, which is distinct from domestic violence and is most common among couples. It is a behavior prevailing in an intimate relationship that leads to physical, psychological, or sexual harm. It is restricted to marital status and extends to non-marital, extramarital relationships, dating couples, live-in relationships, and non-discriminatory. There are instances where women also abuse men in intimate relations. In cases of self-defense, women can be more violent against men. However, overwhelming instances illustrate women as victims in the hands of their male partners, existing or ex-partners. Though attached a social stigma to these relationships, the abuse meted in the hands of their perpetrators affects the physical and psychological traits. This paper mainly emphasizes the nature of Intimate Partner Violence, its instincts, the psychological disorders, and its effects on their right to live with dignity and concludes with possible suggestions and recommendations.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Crozier, Michelle Leigh

<div>This qualitative research study strives to understand the transformative process of drama and performance art through the lived experiences of survivors of gender-based violence. In-person interviews explore the narratives of three survivors that have accessed drama and performance art in a variety of settings such as community theatres, educational institutions, and online forums such as YouTube. This interpretive phenomenological methodology is grounded in an Anti-Oppressive, intersectional transfeminist theoretical framework. The research explores the following question: What is the unique experience of drama and performance art when accessed by survivors of gender-based violence? This research offers an opportunity to hear from survivors about the potential of drama and performance art to facilitate healing and connection to community, while allowing survivors to understand their trauma. The intended outcome of this research project will be an empathetic understanding into the unique experience of drama and</div><div>performance art when conducted with survivors of gender-based violence. The primary purpose of this research is to provide additional knowledge into the potential of drama and performance art in the field of Anti-Oppressive Social Work Practice, specifically when supporting survivors and resisting gender-based violence.</div>


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Crozier, Michelle Leigh

<div>This qualitative research study strives to understand the transformative process of drama and performance art through the lived experiences of survivors of gender-based violence. In-person interviews explore the narratives of three survivors that have accessed drama and performance art in a variety of settings such as community theatres, educational institutions, and online forums such as YouTube. This interpretive phenomenological methodology is grounded in an Anti-Oppressive, intersectional transfeminist theoretical framework. The research explores the following question: What is the unique experience of drama and performance art when accessed by survivors of gender-based violence? This research offers an opportunity to hear from survivors about the potential of drama and performance art to facilitate healing and connection to community, while allowing survivors to understand their trauma. The intended outcome of this research project will be an empathetic understanding into the unique experience of drama and</div><div>performance art when conducted with survivors of gender-based violence. The primary purpose of this research is to provide additional knowledge into the potential of drama and performance art in the field of Anti-Oppressive Social Work Practice, specifically when supporting survivors and resisting gender-based violence.</div>


Author(s):  
Erin Beck ◽  
Lynn Stephen

Abstract We explore how formal mandates associated with Guatemala's 2008 ‘Law against Femicide and Other Forms of Violence against Women’ and with specialised violence against women (VAW) courts have encountered significant challenges due to state-imposed constraints. Drawing on courtroom observations, analyses of case files, and interviews, we find that while formal mandates incorporated feminist understandings of violence against women, which were often internalised among court officials, in daily practice specialised courts reproduced tendencies to depict violence as interpersonal, fragment people's experiences and enact narrow forms of justice that do not incorporate the full intent of the 2008 VAW Law and institutions intended to support it. This case study thus illuminates how and why legal solutions alone are not sufficient to reduce gender-based violence and feminicide, particularly in the face of uneven and openly hostile challenges posed by governments.


2021 ◽  
pp. 088626052110435
Author(s):  
Ruth Rodney ◽  
Denise Gastaldo ◽  
D. Alissa Trotz ◽  
Claire V. Crooks

Gender-based violence (GBV) is a significant issue for youth in Guyana, particularly among young women. Yet, discussions about sex, dating, and violence rarely occur at the community level. To understand the heightened risk for GBV with youth in Guyana, we utilized a critical qualitative design to explore adolescent dating violence with adolescents (14–16 years old), parents, and school officials in a public secondary school in Guyana. In total, 36 racially and religiously diverse participants from low to middle-income households participated in focus groups ( n = 30) and interviews ( n = 6). Discussions centered on dating in adolescence; community awareness of dating violence; gender, racialization, and class in relation to dating violence; and dating violence prevention in schools and family settings. Our results revealed that heteronormative, adversarial gender roles in Guyana are enacted in adolescent relationships in ways that contribute to violence. Two important factors emerged in relation to femininity: female respectability related to sexuality; and the relationship between clothing, sexuality, and social class. Masculinity for adolescent boys was centered on reproducing normative assumptions about femininity and explaining the use of violence through pathologizing race. Participants were also asked to identify gender roles that adolescent boys and girls should embody in relationships, which revealed possibilities for overcoming adversarial roles in relationships. We propose that adolescent GBV prevention initiatives consider long-standing and deeply embedded ideas within gender norms that are connected to sexuality, class, and race. Without accounting for these systemic factors, GBV prevention initiatives and programs may inadvertently perpetuate traditional definitions of masculinity and femininity that contribute to violence.


Sign in / Sign up

Export Citation Format

Share Document