ACM Transactions on Human-Robot Interaction
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Published By Association For Computing Machinery (ACM)

2573-9522

2022 ◽  
Vol 11 (1) ◽  
pp. 1-39
Author(s):  
Minja Axelsson ◽  
Raquel Oliveira ◽  
Mattia Racca ◽  
Ville Kyrki

Design teams of social robots are often multidisciplinary, due to the broad knowledge from different scientific domains needed to develop such complex technology. However, tools to facilitate multidisciplinary collaboration are scarce. We introduce a framework for the participatory design of social robots and corresponding canvas tool for participatory design. The canvases can be applied in different parts of the design process to facilitate collaboration between experts of different fields, as well as to incorporate prospective users of the robot into the design process. We investigate the usability of the proposed canvases with two social robot design case studies: a robot that played games online with teenage users and a librarian robot that guided users at a public library. We observe through participants’ feedback that the canvases have the advantages of (1) providing structure, clarity, and a clear process to the design; (2) encouraging designers and users to share their viewpoints to progress toward a shared one; and (3) providing an educational and enjoyable design experience for the teams.


2022 ◽  
Vol 11 (1) ◽  
pp. 1-33
Author(s):  
Alexander Diel ◽  
Sarah Weigelt ◽  
Karl F. Macdorman

The uncanny valley (UV) effect is a negative affective reaction to human-looking artificial entities. It hinders comfortable, trust-based interactions with android robots and virtual characters. Despite extensive research, a consensus has not formed on its theoretical basis or methodologies. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess operationalizations of human likeness (independent variable) and the UV effect (dependent variable). Of 468 studies, 72 met the inclusion criteria. These studies employed 10 different stimulus creation techniques, 39 affect measures, and 14 indirect measures. Based on 247 effect sizes, a three-level meta-analysis model revealed the UV effect had a large effect size, Hedges’ g = 1.01 [0.80, 1.22]. A mixed-effects meta-regression model with creation technique as the moderator variable revealed face distortion produced the largest effect size, g = 1.46 [0.69, 2.24], followed by distinct entities, g = 1.20 [1.02, 1.38], realism render, g = 0.99 [0.62, 1.36], and morphing, g = 0.94 [0.64, 1.24]. Affective indices producing the largest effects were threatening, likable, aesthetics, familiarity , and eeriness , and indirect measures were dislike frequency, categorization reaction time, like frequency, avoidance , and viewing duration . This meta-analysis—the first on the UV effect—provides a methodological foundation and design principles for future research.


2022 ◽  
Vol 11 (1) ◽  
pp. 1-27
Author(s):  
Frank Kaptein ◽  
Bernd Kiefer ◽  
Antoine Cully ◽  
Oya Celiktutan ◽  
Bert Bierman ◽  
...  

Making the transition to long-term interaction with social-robot systems has been identified as one of the main challenges in human-robot interaction. This article identifies four design principles to address this challenge and applies them in a real-world implementation: cloud-based robot control, a modular design, one common knowledge base for all applications, and hybrid artificial intelligence for decision making and reasoning. The control architecture for this robot includes a common Knowledge-base (ontologies), Data-base, “Hybrid Artificial Brain” (dialogue manager, action selection and explainable AI), Activities Centre (Timeline, Quiz, Break and Sort, Memory, Tip of the Day, \ldots ), Embodied Conversational Agent (ECA, i.e., robot and avatar), and Dashboards (for authoring and monitoring the interaction). Further, the ECA is integrated with an expandable set of (mobile) health applications. The resulting system is a Personal Assistant for a healthy Lifestyle (PAL), which supports diabetic children with self-management and educates them on health-related issues (48 children, aged 6–14, recruited via hospitals in the Netherlands and in Italy). It is capable of autonomous interaction “in the wild” for prolonged periods of time without the need for a “Wizard-of-Oz” (up until 6 months online). PAL is an exemplary system that provides personalised, stable and diverse, long-term human-robot interaction.


2022 ◽  
Vol 11 (1) ◽  
pp. 1-27
Author(s):  
Luis F. C. Figueredo ◽  
Rafael De Castro Aguiar ◽  
Lipeng Chen ◽  
Thomas C. Richards ◽  
Samit Chakrabarty ◽  
...  

This work addresses the problem of planning a robot configuration and grasp to position a shared object during forceful human-robot collaboration, such as a puncturing or a cutting task. Particularly, our goal is to find a robot configuration that positions the jointly manipulated object such that the muscular effort of the human, operating on the same object, is minimized while also ensuring the stability of the interaction for the robot. This raises three challenges. First, we predict the human muscular effort given a human-robot combined kinematic configuration and the interaction forces of a task. To do this, we perform task-space to muscle-space mapping for two different musculoskeletal models of the human arm. Second, we predict the human body kinematic configuration given a robot configuration and the resulting object pose in the workspace. To do this, we assume that the human prefers the body configuration that minimizes the muscular effort. And third, we ensure that, under the forces applied by the human, the robot grasp on the object is stable and the robot joint torques are within limits. Addressing these three challenges, we build a planner that, given a forceful task description, can output the robot grasp on an object and the robot configuration to position the shared object in space. We quantitatively analyze the performance of the planner and the validity of our assumptions. We conduct experiments with human subjects to measure their kinematic configurations, muscular activity, and force output during collaborative puncturing and cutting tasks. The results illustrate the effectiveness of our planner in reducing the human muscular load. For instance, for the puncturing task, our planner is able to reduce muscular load by 69.5\% compared to a user-based selection of object poses.


2022 ◽  
Vol 11 (1) ◽  
pp. 1-42
Author(s):  
Ruisen Liu ◽  
Manisha Natarajan ◽  
Matthew C. Gombolay

As robots become ubiquitous in the workforce, it is essential that human-robot collaboration be both intuitive and adaptive. A robot’s ability to coordinate team activities improves based on its ability to infer and reason about the dynamic (i.e., the “learning curve”) and stochastic task performance of its human counterparts. We introduce a novel resource coordination algorithm that enables robots to schedule team activities by (1) actively characterizing the task performance of their human teammates and (2) ensuring the schedule is robust to temporal constraints given this characterization. We first validate our modeling assumptions via user study. From this user study, we create a data-driven prior distribution over human task performance for our virtual and physical evaluations of human-robot teaming. Second, we show that our methods are scalable and produce high-quality schedules. Third, we conduct a between-subjects experiment (n = 90) to assess the effects on a human-robot team of a robot scheduler actively exploring the humans’ task proficiency. Our results indicate that human-robot working alliance ( p\lt 0.001 ) and human performance ( p=0.00359 ) are maximized when the robot dedicates more time to exploring the capabilities of human teammates.


2022 ◽  
Vol 11 (1) ◽  
pp. 1-24
Author(s):  
Christopher D. Wallbridge ◽  
Alex Smith ◽  
Manuel Giuliani ◽  
Chris Melhuish ◽  
Tony Belpaeme ◽  
...  

We explore the effectiveness of a dynamically processed incremental referring description system using under-specified ambiguous descriptions that are then built upon using linguistic repair statements, which we refer to as a dynamic system. We build a dynamically processed incremental referring description generation system that is able to provide contextual navigational statements to describe an object in a potential real-world situation of nuclear waste sorting and maintenance. In a study of 31 participants, we test the dynamic system in a case where a user is remote operating a robot to sort nuclear waste, with the robot assisting them in identifying the correct barrels to be removed. We compare these against a static non-ambiguous description given in the same scenario. As well as looking at efficiency with time and distance measurements, we also look at user preference. Results show that our dynamic system was a much more efficient method—taking only 62% of the time on average—for finding the correct barrel. Participants also favoured our dynamic system.


2022 ◽  
Vol 11 (1) ◽  
pp. 1-28
Author(s):  
Kerstin Fischer

Existing methodologies to describe anthropomorphism in human-robot interaction often rely either on specific one-time responses to robot behavior, such as keeping the robot's secret, or on post hoc measures, such as questionnaires. Currently, there is no method to describe the dynamics of people's behavior over the course of an interaction and in response to robot behavior. In this paper, I propose a method that allows the researcher to trace anthropomorphizing and non-anthropomorphizing responses to robots dynamically moment-by-moment over the course of human-robot interactions. I illustrate this methodology in a case study and find considerable variation between participants, but also considerable intrapersonal variation in the ways the robot is anthropomorphized. That is, people may respond to the robot as if it was another human in one moment and to its machine-like properties in the next. These findings may influence explanatory models of anthropomorphism.


2022 ◽  
Vol 11 (1) ◽  
pp. 1-50
Author(s):  
Bahar Irfan ◽  
Michael Garcia Ortiz ◽  
Natalia Lyubova ◽  
Tony Belpaeme

User identification is an essential step in creating a personalised long-term interaction with robots. This requires learning the users continuously and incrementally, possibly starting from a state without any known user. In this article, we describe a multi-modal incremental Bayesian network with online learning, which is the first method that can be applied in such scenarios. Face recognition is used as the primary biometric, and it is combined with ancillary information, such as gender, age, height, and time of interaction to improve the recognition. The Multi-modal Long-term User Recognition Dataset is generated to simulate various human-robot interaction (HRI) scenarios and evaluate our approach in comparison to face recognition, soft biometrics, and a state-of-the-art open world recognition method (Extreme Value Machine). The results show that the proposed methods significantly outperform the baselines, with an increase in the identification rate up to 47.9% in open-set and closed-set scenarios, and a significant decrease in long-term recognition performance loss. The proposed models generalise well to new users, provide stability, improve over time, and decrease the bias of face recognition. The models were applied in HRI studies for user recognition, personalised rehabilitation, and customer-oriented service, which showed that they are suitable for long-term HRI in the real world.


2022 ◽  
Vol 11 (1) ◽  
pp. 1-17
Author(s):  
Alessia Vignolo ◽  
Henry Powell ◽  
Francesco Rea ◽  
Alessandra Sciutti ◽  
Luke Mcellin ◽  
...  

We tested the hypothesis that, if a robot apparently invests effort in teaching a new skill to a human participant, the human participant will reciprocate by investing more effort in teaching the robot a new skill, too. To this end, we devised a scenario in which the iCub and a human participant alternated in teaching each other new skills. In the Adaptive condition of the robot teaching phase , the iCub slowed down its movements when repeating a demonstration for the human learner, whereas in the Unadaptive condition it sped the movements up when repeating the demonstration. In a subsequent participant teaching phase , human participants were asked to give the iCub a demonstration, and then to repeat it if the iCub had not understood. We predicted that in the Adaptive condition , participants would reciprocate the iCub’s adaptivity by investing more effort to slow down their movements and to increase segmentation when repeating their demonstration. The results showed that this was true when participants experienced the Adaptive condition after the Unadaptive condition and not when the order was inverted, indicating that participants were particularly sensitive to the changes in the iCub’s level of commitment over the course of the experiment.


2022 ◽  
Vol 11 (1) ◽  
pp. 1-24
Author(s):  
Linda Onnasch ◽  
Clara Laudine Hildebrandt

The application of anthropomorphic features to robots is generally considered beneficial for human-robot interaction (HRI ). Although previous research has mainly focused on social robots, the phenomenon gains increasing attention in industrial human-Robot interaction as well. In this study, the impact of anthropomorphic design of a collaborative industrial robot on the dynamics of trust and visual attention allocation was examined. Participants interacted with a robot, which was either anthropomorphically or non-anthropomorphically designed. Unexpectedly, attribute-based trust measures revealed no beneficial effect of anthropomorphism but even a negative impact on the perceived reliability of the robot. Trust behavior was not significantly affected by an anthropomorphic robot design during faultless interactions, but showed a relatively steeper decrease after participants experienced a failure of the robot. With regard to attention allocation, the study clearly reveals a distracting effect of anthropomorphic robot design. The results emphasize that anthropomorphism might not be an appropriate feature in industrial HRI as it not only failed to reveal positive effects on trust, but distracted participants from relevant task areas which might be a significant drawback with regard to occupational safety in HRI.


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