Public Library
Recently Published Documents


TOTAL DOCUMENTS

4272
(FIVE YEARS 1223)

H-INDEX

24
(FIVE YEARS 11)

2021 ◽  
pp. 146879842110466
Author(s):  
Soohyung Joo ◽  
Maria Cahill ◽  
Erin Ingram ◽  
Hayley Hoffman ◽  
Amy Olson ◽  
...  

Through analysis of the language, this study aimed to investigate the current practice of using songs in public library storytimes. Language interactions in 68 storytime programs involving 652 child participants were observed and transcribed. Then, textual analysis was conducted to examine the language of singing songs, focusing on how language used in singing songs differs from spoken language in storytime programs. Specifically, the study compared sentence and grammar structure between singing and non-singing language and explored how topics and themes covered in singing language compare with those of spoken language. In addition, the study examined singing accompanied by use of props and movements. The findings of this study indicate that the language of singing in storytime programs is rich; thereby, signaling the power of singing with young children as means to advance language development. Practical implications and strategies for maximizing integration of singing in storytimes and other informal learning activities for young children are discussed.


2021 ◽  
Vol 91 (4) ◽  
pp. 402-419
Author(s):  
Mark Giesler

Author(s):  
Melissa Gross ◽  
Don Latham

2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Benjamin Palmer

<p><b>Aotearoa New Zealand’s architectural landscape has been said to rely on other nations as well as carrying the residual effects of colonisation within its built environment through the mimicking of European and Anglo-American styles (Bird, 1992). Despite the increasing profile of what has been a continuous Māori architectural tradition, since colonisation New Zealand’s indigenous Māori culture generally has had a diminished presence. There are successful examples of New Zealand’s bi-cultural heritage, but these instances are few. A large portion of the examples that do attempt to represent this bi-culturalism are usually watered down to iconographic representations of traditional art and architecture. </b></p> <p>This research explores ways in which New Zealand’s architectural identity can better reflect New Zealand’s own society, culture, materiality, and nationhood. In order to do this, the focus of this research takes a radical approach turning to a study of the career of Japanese architect Kenzo Tange (1913-1945) who has been able to successfully confront issues of tradition, society, and nationhood through architectural designs. The intent of this research is not to duplicate Tange’s style. It is rather that through a series of studies, Tange’s methodologies and processes related to issues of tradition, society, and nationhood are examined and applied. Tange’s modernist work drew from tradition to develop a renewed design sensibility in a contemporary Japanese idiom. His approach is examined to determine a strategy that could reinforce characteristics of New Zealand’s nationhood through architectural design. </p> <p>To extend the study beyond Tange’s career, the career of Japanese architect Kengo Kuma (b. 1954) is analysed for the contemporary perspective his work brings to some of the issues that Tange confronted. This approach is applied to the design for a new public library in Wellington, where the findings from this case study are implemented amongst issues pertaining to society, culture, and nationhood in order to continue the development of New Zealand’s architectural identity. </p> <p>This design is also used in an exploration to discover how a decolonised library building could be created in New Zealand. Libraries in their current form are mainly seen as repositories that accommodate access to physical and digital forms of information. This design considers alternative ways in which information can be shared and accessed that do not currently exist within New Zealand’s library models. The effectiveness of this process is then reflected upon and conclusions are drawn.</p>


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Benjamin Palmer

<p><b>Aotearoa New Zealand’s architectural landscape has been said to rely on other nations as well as carrying the residual effects of colonisation within its built environment through the mimicking of European and Anglo-American styles (Bird, 1992). Despite the increasing profile of what has been a continuous Māori architectural tradition, since colonisation New Zealand’s indigenous Māori culture generally has had a diminished presence. There are successful examples of New Zealand’s bi-cultural heritage, but these instances are few. A large portion of the examples that do attempt to represent this bi-culturalism are usually watered down to iconographic representations of traditional art and architecture. </b></p> <p>This research explores ways in which New Zealand’s architectural identity can better reflect New Zealand’s own society, culture, materiality, and nationhood. In order to do this, the focus of this research takes a radical approach turning to a study of the career of Japanese architect Kenzo Tange (1913-1945) who has been able to successfully confront issues of tradition, society, and nationhood through architectural designs. The intent of this research is not to duplicate Tange’s style. It is rather that through a series of studies, Tange’s methodologies and processes related to issues of tradition, society, and nationhood are examined and applied. Tange’s modernist work drew from tradition to develop a renewed design sensibility in a contemporary Japanese idiom. His approach is examined to determine a strategy that could reinforce characteristics of New Zealand’s nationhood through architectural design. </p> <p>To extend the study beyond Tange’s career, the career of Japanese architect Kengo Kuma (b. 1954) is analysed for the contemporary perspective his work brings to some of the issues that Tange confronted. This approach is applied to the design for a new public library in Wellington, where the findings from this case study are implemented amongst issues pertaining to society, culture, and nationhood in order to continue the development of New Zealand’s architectural identity. </p> <p>This design is also used in an exploration to discover how a decolonised library building could be created in New Zealand. Libraries in their current form are mainly seen as repositories that accommodate access to physical and digital forms of information. This design considers alternative ways in which information can be shared and accessed that do not currently exist within New Zealand’s library models. The effectiveness of this process is then reflected upon and conclusions are drawn.</p>


Author(s):  
Mamotshabo Johanna Boloka ◽  
Glenrose Velile Jiyane ◽  
Samuel Mojapelo

Author(s):  
Fernando Juárez-Urquijo

The maker movement is a social movement with a craft spirit through which digital fabrication methods have become accessible at a personal level. Public libraries are ideal for offering makerspaces that enable the collaborative use of tools and technologies to foster informal learning. Three-dimensional (3D) printing has been one of the keys to the expansion of the maker movement, and its presence in libraries, often identified as the “gateway” to the maker philosophy, is not unusual, albeit remaining more a desire than a reality. We recount herein our experience of purchasing and setting up a 3D printer to enable a reflection on makerspaces in a public library. Resumen El movimiento maker es un movimiento social en el que los métodos de fabricación digital se han hecho accesibles a escala personal. Las bibliotecas públicas son ideales para ofrecer espacios para creadores (makerspaces) en los que se propone el uso colaborativo de herramientas y tecnologías para fomentar el aprendizaje informal. La impresión 3D ha sido una de las claves para la expansión del movimiento maker y su incipiente presencia en bibliotecas, identificada a menudo como “la vía de acceso” a la filosofía maker, sigue siendo más un deseo que una realidad. En este trabajo contamos la experiencia de compra y puesta en marcha de una impresora 3D para reflexionar sobre los espacios de creación en una biblioteca pública.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Salene Schloffel‐Armstrong ◽  
Tom Baker ◽  
Robin A. Kearns
Keyword(s):  

2021 ◽  
Vol 35 (2) ◽  
pp. 36
Author(s):  
S. Kalaivani ◽  
S. Shanmugathasan

2021 ◽  
Vol ahead-of-print (ahead-of-print) ◽  
Author(s):  
Mark Edward Phillips ◽  
Hannah Tarver

Purpose This study furthers metadata quality research by providing complementary network-based metrics and insights to analyze metadata records and identify areas for improvement. Design/methodology/approach Metadata record graphs apply network analysis to metadata field values; this study evaluates the interconnectedness of subjects within each Hub aggregated into the Digital Public Library of America. It also reviews the effects of NACO normalization – simulating revision of values for consistency – and breaking up pre-coordinated subject headings – to simulate applying the Faceted Application of Subject Terminology to Library of Congress Subject Headings. Findings Network statistics complement count- or value-based metrics by providing context related to the number of records a user might actually find starting from one item and moving to others via shared subject values. Additionally, connectivity increases through the normalization of values to correct or adjust for formatting differences or by breaking pre-coordinated subject strings into separate topics. Research limitations/implications This analysis focuses on exact-string matches, which is the lowest-common denominator for searching, although many search engines and digital library indexes may use less stringent matching methods. In terms of practical implications for evaluating or improving subjects in metadata, the normalization components demonstrate where resources may be most effectively allocated for these activities (depending on a collection). Originality/value Although the individual components of this research are not particularly novel, network analysis has not generally been applied to metadata analysis. This research furthers previous studies related to metadata quality analysis of aggregations and digital collections in general.


Sign in / Sign up

Export Citation Format

Share Document