mental hospitals
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2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
◽  
Rebecca McLaughlan

<p>Thousands of New Zealanders were treated in the nation’s mental hospitals in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Existing research has examined this history of institutionalisation from the perspectives of policy, psychiatric medicine and nursing culture, but to date little has been written about the built fabric of this type of institutional care. This dissertation asks what does the architectural approach taken to Seacliff Asylum (1878-84), Kingseat Hospital (1927-40) and Cherry Farm Hospital (1943-71) indicate about official attitudes to mental illness in New Zealand. Architecture was thought to be capable of performing a curative role in the treatment of mental illness; the administrators of New Zealand’s mental hospitals stated this belief publically in various press releases and reports to the government between 1878 and 1957. This dissertation examines Seacliff, Kingseat and Cherry Farm against current thought regarding the treatment of mental illness and against best architectural practice in mental hospital design.   While these three institutions were the jewels in the crown of New Zealand’s mental hospital network, only Kingseat could be considered an exemplary hospital of its time. The compromises that occurred in the construction of Seacliff, Kingseat and Cherry Farm hospitals indicate that meeting the needs of the mentally ill was only one of a number of agendas that were addressed by the officials involved in the design of these institutions. Many of these agendas were peripheral to the delivery of mental health care, such as the political desire for colonial propaganda and professional concerns of marginalisation, and conflicted with the attainment of ideal environments for the treatment of mental illness. The needs of the mentally ill were a low priority for successive New Zealand governments who exhibited a reluctance to spend taxpayer funds on patients who were not considered curable. The architects and medical advisors involved in the design of these facilities did attempt to meet the needs of these patients; however, they were limited by a design and procurement process that elevated political and operational concerns over the curative potential of these hospitals.   This dissertation also examines the role of individuals in the design of these institutions. Architect Robert Lawson was reproached for deficiencies in the curative potential of Seacliff Asylum. Similarly, medical administrator Theodore Gray has received criticism for limiting the development of New Zealand’s wider network of mental hospital care. This dissertation establishes that Lawson and Gray deserve greater recognition for their relative contributions to the architecture created, within New Zealand, for the treatment of mental illness.</p>


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
◽  
Rebecca McLaughlan

<p>Thousands of New Zealanders were treated in the nation’s mental hospitals in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Existing research has examined this history of institutionalisation from the perspectives of policy, psychiatric medicine and nursing culture, but to date little has been written about the built fabric of this type of institutional care. This dissertation asks what does the architectural approach taken to Seacliff Asylum (1878-84), Kingseat Hospital (1927-40) and Cherry Farm Hospital (1943-71) indicate about official attitudes to mental illness in New Zealand. Architecture was thought to be capable of performing a curative role in the treatment of mental illness; the administrators of New Zealand’s mental hospitals stated this belief publically in various press releases and reports to the government between 1878 and 1957. This dissertation examines Seacliff, Kingseat and Cherry Farm against current thought regarding the treatment of mental illness and against best architectural practice in mental hospital design.   While these three institutions were the jewels in the crown of New Zealand’s mental hospital network, only Kingseat could be considered an exemplary hospital of its time. The compromises that occurred in the construction of Seacliff, Kingseat and Cherry Farm hospitals indicate that meeting the needs of the mentally ill was only one of a number of agendas that were addressed by the officials involved in the design of these institutions. Many of these agendas were peripheral to the delivery of mental health care, such as the political desire for colonial propaganda and professional concerns of marginalisation, and conflicted with the attainment of ideal environments for the treatment of mental illness. The needs of the mentally ill were a low priority for successive New Zealand governments who exhibited a reluctance to spend taxpayer funds on patients who were not considered curable. The architects and medical advisors involved in the design of these facilities did attempt to meet the needs of these patients; however, they were limited by a design and procurement process that elevated political and operational concerns over the curative potential of these hospitals.   This dissertation also examines the role of individuals in the design of these institutions. Architect Robert Lawson was reproached for deficiencies in the curative potential of Seacliff Asylum. Similarly, medical administrator Theodore Gray has received criticism for limiting the development of New Zealand’s wider network of mental hospital care. This dissertation establishes that Lawson and Gray deserve greater recognition for their relative contributions to the architecture created, within New Zealand, for the treatment of mental illness.</p>


2021 ◽  
pp. 0957154X2110349
Author(s):  
Colin Cowan

In England in the early twentieth century, mental observation wards in workhouses developed as a parallel service to the asylums for emergency mental health admissions under the 1890 Lunacy Act, particularly in urban areas and especially London on account of local policy. The purpose of the wards was initial patient assessment and early discharge or certification, and there was controversy between their medical supporters and the Board of Control about any extension of their remit which might usurp the role of the mental hospitals. Their significance declined with changing policy in the NHS era, as more emergency admissions went to mental hospitals, and local treatment units emerged. This article explores the history of these services in the context of the changing legal and policy frameworks.


2021 ◽  
Vol 21 (2) ◽  
pp. 511
Author(s):  
Kamariyah Kamariyah ◽  
Yuliana Yuliana

Indonesia According to WHO (2017) data, there are about 35 million people affected by depression, 60 million people are affected by bipolar, 21 million are affected by schizophrenia, and 47.5 million are affected by dementia. The nursing problems that arise from the medical diagnosis of schizophrenia include hallucinations. Based on data from Mental Hospitals in Indonesia, about 70% of patients undergoing treatment in inpatient wards of mental hospitals experience hallucinations nursing problems. Data from the inpatient room of the Jambi Provincial Mental Hospital in 2018 from 12 rooms the number of patients experiencing hallucinations was 4320 patients. The management of hallucinations is through the continuous application of comprehensive nursing care, accompanied by incorrect modality therapies. one of them is Group Activity Therapy. Objective: To determine the effect of Sensory Stimulation Group Activity Therapy (TAK) on changes in the level of hallucinations in hallucinating patients in the inpatient ward of the Jambi Province Mental Hospital. Research Methodology Quantitative research with a Quasi Experiment research design that uses Pre-Test and Post-Test with Control Group with drawing stimulation therapy intervention, data collection is done by interview and observation. The statistical test in this study used the Independent T Test


2021 ◽  
Vol 12 (1) ◽  
pp. 47-66 ◽  
Author(s):  
Kirsi Heimonen

This article discusses an artistic act: walking for seven sequential days inside a cage made of chicken wire in the grounds of a former mental hospital in Lapinlahti in Helsinki, Finland and its potential to offer insights into past events in mental hospitals through the notions of corporeal attunement and atmosphere. The idea for Walking Cage was prompted by a word in the data, which included memories by patients and non-patients of Finnish mental hospitals gathered in connection with a multidisciplinary research project. Passers-by, occasional co-walkers, weather conditions and the grounds of the former mental hospital partially formed and deformed the atmospheric qualities of the artistic research event. These qualities were experienced through corporeal attuning influenced by the Skinner Releasing Technique, a somatic movement method. The article proposes a singular way of approaching the possibilities of corporeal openness and sensibility in a choreographic process in which, illuminated by, among others, the notions of threshold and limit, one becomes a stranger to oneself by surrendering oneself to atmospheric intensities. This artistic research study adopts a phenomenological approach, drawing mainly on the ideas of Jean-Luc Nancy, Mikel Dufrenne and Emmanuel Levinas.


2021 ◽  
Vol 10 (2) ◽  
pp. 134
Author(s):  
Siti Rohajawati ◽  
Habibullah Akbar

For Southeast Asia’s largest population, the prevalence of the emotional disorder has increased from 6% in 2013 up to 9.8% in 2018. Aligned with the e-government program, Knowledge Management (KM) offers an easier, faster, and transparent mental health services. However, the implementation relies on various factors. We conducted a workshop at 7 (seven) mental hospitals. The questionnaires were used to identify the factors that consist of awareness & commitment, strategy, culture, structure, people, and information technology (IT). We examine the hypothesis factors of the relationship by employing the statistical analyses of correlation. This study provides at testing the relationship between factors of people, process, and technology, for KM implementation in Indonesian mental hospitals. The results of the study confirm that the relationship between Process to Technology and People has a positive effect on significance. Meanwhile, the adop-tion of the existing technical facilities have not significant support for the needs of the KM. To sum up, the study suggests further improve-ment of leadership and systems in order to serve the best of mental healthcare.  


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