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2021 ◽  
Vol 10 (10) ◽  
pp. 390
Author(s):  
Omar Díaz ◽  
Gabriela Riquelme ◽  
Gibrán Rivera

Open Science and open research data have the potential to speed up the processes of science and to generate benefits to society. However, the openness of research data and science cannot be taken for granted since there is a trend toward the capitalization of knowledge. In addition, each area of knowledge differs in terms of the data used and the rules that govern each scientific community. The aim of this article is to analyze social researchers’ interest in sharing research data within the context of a Mexican university. Based on the constructivist grounded theory approach, 12 interviews were conducted with social scientists from a higher education institution in Mexico. From the analysis, four categories associated with the researchers’ attitudes of sharing their data emerged. The findings exhibit that researchers’ interest in sharing their scientific data is prone to (1) selectively sharing, (2) perpetuating the system, (3) protecting privacy and (4) considering resources. These results show that the scientists interviewed show an opposite inclination to Open Science, since they are not willing to share their data openly, including the fact that within the Mexican context, the practice of sharing data openly is not encouraged.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Kamesh Namuduri

Advanced Air Mobility (AAM) is a newly emerging industry focus, as well as a research and development discipline. Innovations and technologies resulting from AAM will change the way that we move cargo and people in and around cities. Industry is moving fast with excitement to deploy AAM solutions. However, there are multiple technical challenges that need to be overcome before AAM becomes a reality. This article takes a closer look at the technology readiness level of AAM solutions, identifies open research problems and directions to address them.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Kamesh Namuduri

Advanced Air Mobility (AAM) is a newly emerging industry focus, as well as a research and development discipline. Innovations and technologies resulting from AAM will change the way that we move cargo and people in and around cities. Industry is moving fast with excitement to deploy AAM solutions. However, there are multiple technical challenges that need to be overcome before AAM becomes a reality. This article takes a closer look at the technology readiness level of AAM solutions, identifies open research problems and directions to address them.


2021 ◽  
pp. 1-3
Author(s):  
Katherine Hill

Keyword(s):  

2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Adrienne Shaw ◽  
Michael Scharkow ◽  
Zheng Joyce Wang

Abstract Many disciplines have been debating and enacting a range of policies, procedures, and practices that fall under the umbrella term “open research” or “open science.” Following the publication of “An Agenda for Open Science in Communication”, we invited communication scholars to continue the conversation on what open research practices broadly might mean for our diverse field. Specifically, we sought work that: looked empirically at the need for and impact of open research practices; considered the unintended consequences of calls for open research practices broadly; and that reflected on what such a move would mean for qualitative and humanistic communication research. We hope the collection of articles in this special issue motivates and facilitates an ongoing conversation on open research practices in the field of communication.


Author(s):  
Shallu Kotwal ◽  
Priya Rani ◽  
Tasleem Arif ◽  
Jatinder Manhas ◽  
Sparsh Sharma

2021 ◽  
Vol 11 (1) ◽  
Author(s):  
Asjad Naqvi ◽  
Irene Monasterolo

AbstractNatural disasters negatively impact regions and exacerbate socioeconomic vulnerabilities. While the direct impacts of natural disasters are well understood, the channels through which these shocks spread to non-affected regions, still represents an open research question. In this paper we propose modelling socioeconomic systems as spatially-explicit, multi-layer behavioral networks, where the interplay of supply-side production, and demand-side consumption decisions, can help us understand how climate shocks cascade. We apply this modelling framework to analyze the spatial-temporal evolution of vulnerability following a negative food-production shock in one part of an agriculture-dependent economy. Simulation results show that vulnerability is cyclical, and its distribution critically depends on the network density and distance from the epicenter of the shock. We also introduce a new multi-layer measure, the Vulnerability Rank (VRank), which synthesizes various location-level risks into a single index. This framework can help design policies, aimed to better understand, effectively respond, and build resilience to natural disasters. This is particularly important for poorer regions, where response time is critical and financial resources are limited.


2021 ◽  
Vol 11 (19) ◽  
pp. 9196
Author(s):  
Yonggang Kim ◽  
Gyungmin Kim ◽  
Youngwoo Oh ◽  
Wooyeol Choi

As the demands for uplink traffic increase, improving the uplink throughput has attracted research attention in IEEE 802.11 networks. To avoid excessive competition among stations and enhance the uplink throughput performance, the IEEE 802.11ax standard supports uplink multi-user transmission scenarios, in which AP triggers certain stations in a network to transmit uplink data simultaneously. The performance of uplink multi-user transmissions highly depends on the scheduler, and station scheduling is still an open research area in IEEE-802.11ax-based networks. In this paper, we propose a transmission delay-based uplink multi-user scheduling method. The proposed method consists of two steps. In the first step, the proposed method makcreateses station clusters so that stations in each cluster have similar expected transmission delays. The transmission delay-based station clustering increases the ues of uplink data channels during the uplink multi-user transmission scenario specified in IEEE 802.11ax. In the second step, the proposed method selects cluster for uplink multi-user transmissions. The cluster selection can be performed with a proportional fair-based approach. With the highly channel-efficient station cluster, the proposed scheduling method increases network throughput performance. Through the IEEE 802.11ax standard compliant simulations, we verify the network throughput performance of the proposed uplink scheduling method.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Adam H. Sparks ◽  
Emerson del Ponte ◽  
Kaique S. Alves ◽  
Zachary S. L. Foster ◽  
Niklaus J. Grünwald

Abstract Open research practices have been highlighted extensively during the last ten years in many fields of scientific study as essential standards needed to promote transparency and reproducibility of scientific results. Scientific claims can only be evaluated based on how protocols, materials, equipment and methods were described; data were collected and prepared; and, analyses were conducted. Openly sharing protocols, data and computational code is central for current scholarly dissemination and communication, but in many fields, including plant pathology, adoption of these practices has been slow. We randomly selected 300 articles published from 2012 to 2018 across 21 journals representative of the plant pathology discipline and assigned them scores reflecting their openness and reproducibility. We found that most of the articles were not following protocols for open science, and were failing to share data or code in a reproducible way. We also propose that use of open-source tools facilitates reproducible work and analyses benefitting not just readers, but the authors as well. Finally, we also provide ideas and tools to promote open, reproducible research practices among plant pathologists.


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