Bedtime Procrastination
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2021 ◽  
Vol 21 (1) ◽  
Author(s):  
Guanghui Cui ◽  
Yongtian Yin ◽  
Shaojie Li ◽  
Lei Chen ◽  
Xinyao Liu ◽  
...  

Abstract Background Cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have found that problematic mobile phone use, bedtime procrastination, sleep quality, and depressive symptoms are strongly associated. However, studies are inconsistent regarding whether problematic mobile phone use predicts depressive symptoms or vice versa, and sleep factors have been infrequently focused on in this regard. In addition, few studies have examined the longitudinal associations and directions of effects between these factors. Therefore, this study aims to explore the longitudinal relationship among problematic mobile phone use, bedtime procrastination, sleep quality, and depressive symptoms in college students. Methods Overall, 1181 college students completed questionnaires on problematic mobile phone use, bedtime procrastination, sleep quality, and depressive symptoms at two time points 12 months apart. A cross-lagged model was used to examine the longitudinal relationship between these factors. Results Cross-lagged analyses showed significant bidirectional relationships of problematic mobile phone use with bedtime procrastination and depressive symptoms. Additionally, there were also significant bidirectional relationships of sleep quality with bedtime procrastination and depressive symptoms. Problematic mobile phone use predicted subsequent sleep quality one-way, and bedtime procrastination predicted subsequent depressive symptoms one-way. Conclusions This study further expands our understanding of the longitudinal and bidirectional relationships among problematic mobile phone use, bedtime procrastination, sleep quality and depressive symptoms and helps school mental health educators design targeted interventions to reduce problematic mobile phone use, sleep problems, and depressive symptoms among college students.


Author(s):  
Paula Magalhães ◽  
Beatriz Pereira ◽  
André Oliveira ◽  
David Santos ◽  
José Carlos Núñez ◽  
...  

Background: Sleep plays a key role in our overall function, and sleep insufficiency has been highlighted as a major health issue. ‘Bedtime procrastination’—i.e., needlessly delaying the time one goes to bed without external reasons—is one reason for sleep insufficiency. The present research aims to explore the interrelationships among Bedtime Procrastination, other domains of Procrastination, and routine-related variables. Methods: The mediating effects of Wake-up Time and Dinner Time on the relationship between Bedtime Procrastination and General Procrastination, Academic Procrastination, and Perceived Importance of Sleep were tested. Self-reported questionnaires were used, and the sample comprised of 446 university students. Results: A partial mediation model was found. General Procrastination, Academic Procrastination, and Perceived Importance of Sleep showed direct effects on Bedtime Procrastination. Moreover, Academic and General Procrastination were positively associated with Bedtime Procrastination, whereas Perceived Importance of Sleep was negatively associated with Bedtime Procrastination. Indirect effects of the Perceived Importance of Sleep and General Procrastination, as mediated by Wake-up Time and Dinner Time, on Bedtime Procrastination were also found. Conclusions: Personal routines (Wake-up Time and Dinner Time) along with individual characteristics (General and Academic Procrastination) and beliefs (perceived importance of sleep) may affect Bedtime Procrastination. Present results highlight the complexity of Bedtime Procrastination.


2021 ◽  
Vol Volume 13 ◽  
pp. 1307-1318
Author(s):  
Dexin Meng ◽  
Ying Zhao ◽  
Jing Guo ◽  
Huiying Xu ◽  
Yiming Fu ◽  
...  

2021 ◽  
Vol 46 (2) ◽  
pp. 495-507
Author(s):  
Ramazan KIRAÇ ◽  
Sait SÖYLER ◽  
Göksel YILMAZ ◽  
Seda UYAR

SLEEP ◽  
2021 ◽  
Vol 44 (Supplement_2) ◽  
pp. A297-A297
Author(s):  
Rebecca Campbell ◽  
Roselee Ledesma ◽  
Linda Guzman ◽  
Ana Bridges

Abstract Introduction There is a high rate of sleep disorders and anxiety in primary care settings and patients are most likely to report such issues to their primary care provider. This study assessed whether total sleep time and bedtime procrastination mediated the association between anxiety and sleep problems when covarying for age and attitudes about sleep. Methods 308 adult primary care patients seen at either a university integrated primary care clinic (n = 147; 47.7%) or federally qualified health center (n = 161; 52.3%) from August 2019 to March 2020 completed intake paperwork including questions assessing psychiatric symptoms and sleep. Results A structural equation model was used. To test for statistical mediation, we performed 500 bootstraps and examined bias-corrected estimates. The model evidenced good fit, X2 (16) = 22.53, p = .127, CFI = .98, TLI = .95, SRMR = .03, RMSEA = .04 [90% CI: .00, .07]. All manifest variables loaded significantly onto their latent factors (standardized loadings > .40, p values < .05). The model explained 14.7% of the variance in total sleep time (TST), 14.8% in sleep procrastination, and 54.0% in sleep problems. Anxiety was negatively associated with TST (β = -.36, p < .001) and positively associated with bedtime procrastination (β = .35, p < .001) and greater sleep problems (β = .63, p = .006). The association between anxiety and sleep problems was not statistically mediated by TST. There was a significant indirect effect of anxiety on sleep problems through bedtime procrastination. The total effect of anxiety on sleep problems was significant (β = .70, p = .003). We found a significant direct association between age and TST, and age and bedtime procrastination. However, there was no significant direct association between age and sleep problems (β = .00, p = .984). Sleep attitudes were unrelated to any of the primary study variables. None of the exogenous variable covariances were significant. The covariance between TST and bedtime procrastination was significant. Conclusion Sleep problems are pervasive and complex. This study highlights factors related to sleep problems and support anxiety and pre-bedtime behaviors as treatment targets. Support (if any) D40HP29826 (PI: Ana J. Bridges).


SLEEP ◽  
2021 ◽  
Vol 44 (Supplement_2) ◽  
pp. A153-A153
Author(s):  
Goeun Kim ◽  
Hyojin Nam ◽  
Huisu Jeon ◽  
Sooyeon Suh

Abstract Introduction Bedtime Procrastination (BP) is defined as the behavior of voluntarily delaying going to bed, without having external reasons for doing so. Recent research on procrastination behavior suggests that when negative emotions are elevated, procrastination behaviors can be triggered in order to find pleasure to avoid and alleviate them. Procrastination can also occur when there is difficulty regulating emotions. In addition, the reason for bedtime procrastination may be different depending on whether the individuals present with insomnia. According to previous studies, patients with insomnia may exhibit more pronounced negative avoidance of bedtime due to prolonged sleeplessness. Therefore, this study compared the difference between of the bedtime procrastination and the emotional regulation strategies between the insomnia group and the healthy group. Methods This study was conducted in 582 adults (mean age 23.06 ±2.16 years), 81.6% females. Individuals scoring higher than 15 on the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) were classified into the insomnia group (n=375), and those less than 15 were classified into the healthy group (n=207). Participants completed the Bedtime Procrastination Scale (BPS), Emotional Regulation Strategies Checklist. Data was analyzed using descriptive statistics, chi square test, and independent t tests. Results The insomnia group had significantly higher bedtime procrastination scores than the healthy group (t=-6.241, p<.001), and also the avoidant/distractive regulation style score was significantly higher (t=-1.969, p<.05). In addition, the score of active regulation style was significantly lower in the insomnia group than in the healthy group (t=3.050, p<.01). There was no significant difference between the two groups in the support-seeking regulation style. Conclusion Based on these results, it was confirmed that there was a difference in the bedtime procrastination and the emotional regulation strategies between the insomnia group and the healthy group. Support (if any) This work was supported by the Ministry of Education of the Republic of Korea and the National Research Foundation of Korea(NRF-2018S1A5A8026807)


SLEEP ◽  
2021 ◽  
Vol 44 (Supplement_2) ◽  
pp. A153-A154
Author(s):  
Huisu Jeon ◽  
Sonhye Jeoung ◽  
Goeun Kim ◽  
Hyeyoung An ◽  
Hyojin Nam ◽  
...  

Abstract Introduction Bedtime Procrastination (BP) is defined as the behavior of going to bed later than intended, despite the absence of external factors. Bedtime procrastination is also prevalent among insomnia patients, and is associated with various sleep problems. Recent studies suggest emotional regulation as a mechanism of the procrastination behavior that is the conceptual foundation of bedtime procrastination. Emotional regulation difficulties are also associated with insomnia, but there is still a lack of research on the relationship between insomnia, emotional regulation strategies and bedtime procrastination. Thus, the study assumed that severity of insomnia would affect bedtime procrastination, and examined the moderating effect of the emotional regulation strategies in this relationship. Methods This study was conducted in 376 adults (mean age 23.73 ±2.14 years, 84.6% females). Participants were asked to answer Bedtime procrastination scale (BPS), an emotional regulation strategy checklist, and the Insomnia severity scale (ISI). Results As a result, a significant positive correlation was found between insomnia severity and bedtime procrastination (r=.286, p<.01), and avoidant/distractive regulation style (r=.101, p<.05). active regulation style (r=-.172, p<.01) and support seeking regulation style (r=-.102, p<.01) showed a significant negative correlation with the severity of insomnia. Bedtime procrastination behavior showed significant negative correlation only with active regulation style (r=-.151, p<.01). Support seeking regulation style moderated the relationship between insomnia and bedtime procrastination behavior (B=.0165, 95%, CI=.0014, .0316). The interaction effect between insomnia and support seeking regulation style was also significant (∆R^2=.0112, p<.05), indicating that the effect of insomnia on bedtime procrastination depends on the level of use of the support seeking regulation style. Conclusion These findings suggest that the level of support seeking regulation style is meaningful in terms of how insomnia affects bedtime procrastination. Support (if any) This work was supported by the Ministry of Education of the Republic of Korea and the National Research Foundation of Korea(NRF-2018S1A5A8026807)


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