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2021 ◽  
Vol 2 (2) ◽  
pp. 36-45
Author(s):  
Muhammad Zuhri

The purpose of this study was to reveal the role of students as agents of change in improving the quality of education in the Batang Kuis sub-district. This study used qualitative methods, observations and interviews as techniques in data collection in this study. The results of this study are that students are agents who have more thoughts to lead to changes that are beneficial to the surrounding community in many ways. As stated in the Tri Dharma of Higher Education which explains about education and teaching which is something that students do, namely studying on campus and off campus and being able to implement the knowledge they have acquired to many people. Second, regarding research and development, subordinate students have an obligation to be able to research any problems that occur in the community, especially in the field of education, so that when students understand the problems that occur in society, students must develop community resources and the potential of the students themselves to implemented for the general public. Finally, community service is that students must be able to provide a positive side such as providing socialization to the community about something new and students can be a mouthpiece for community aspirations.


Author(s):  
Eman Elayeh ◽  
Amal Akour ◽  
Randa Haddadin

Background Lack of definitive cure for COVID-19 and the late introduction of a vaccine were responsible to push the general public to look for a remedy to treat or prevent COVID-19. The objective of this study was to evaluate patterns and factors that affect self-medication practices in Jordan during the pandemic. Methods This was a cross-sectional study using an online questionnaire that was developed, piloted and distributed to the general public via various social media platforms. The questionnaire assessed the type of drugs and treatments used to self -medicate, the reasons behind their self- medication, and the factors affecting their practices. Results A total of 1179 participants (females 46.4%) with a mean age of 32 (SD=12.5) completed the questionnaire. The overall prevalence of the use of at least one product to treat or prevent COVID-19 was 80.4 %. The most commonly used products to self-medicate were vitamin C (57.6%), followed by paracetamol (51.9%), zinc (44.8%) and vitamin D (32.5%). Female gender (odds ratio [OR]) = 1.603, working in the medical field (OR =1.697), and history of COVID-19 infection (OR =2.026) were variables associated with self-medication. The most common sources of participants’ information about drugs to prevent or treat COVID-19 were newspapers (n=519, 44.0%), followed by pharmacists (43.4%), friends (33.8%) and internet searching such as Google (30.7%). Conclusion This study identified the main drugs and supplements used during COVID-19 and the motives behind their use. It also identified the most influential source of information on the public during the pandemic. Self-medication can lead to worsening of the patient’s health and delay seeking medical advice from healthcare professionals. Efforts should be done to help mitigate risks of self-medications by active involvement of pharmacists and other members of healthcare team to refute false claims about drug, especially in the media.


2021 ◽  
Vol 17 (2) ◽  
pp. 317-345
Author(s):  
Aneta Pinková ◽  
Jakub Jusko

Abstract This article is a contribution to the ‘know your data’ approach to the issue of measuring corruption, in two specific areas: the impact of the way questions are formulated on the results of surveys on corruption perception; and the potential pitfalls of using businesspeople as expert respondents in surveys measuring corruption. The article first presents and analyses the sources of two most frequently used indicators to measure corruption perceptions – the Corruption Perception Index and the Control of Corruption, one of the Worldwide Governance Indicators. Based on this analysis, hypotheses are posed on how the formulation of the questions will influence the out-comes of surveys, and what differences there will be between studies conducted on the general public and businesspeople. These are tested using data obtained from two original survey experiments conducted concurrently, one on a representative sample of the public and another on businesspeople.


2021 ◽  
Vol 5 (4) ◽  
pp. RV6-RV9
Author(s):  
Jagriti Yadav ◽  
Pradeep Tangade ◽  
Ankita Jain ◽  
Vikas Singh ◽  
Jeevan Josh

Oral health is an important component of a person's overall health. Oral health care services have long been a concern in underdeveloped nations like India since they are expensive, inaccessible, and underutilized   by the general public. Oral health treatment is costly in both the business and private sectors levels and are inexpensive in medical and dental schools, where they are offered by trainees under good supervision. Unawareness of the importance of oral health, a lack of recognized needs, financial restraints, cultural and psychological hurdles are only a few of the challenges that prevent the general public from taking advantage of these services. Oral health insurance, government implementation awareness initiatives, and the development of oral health policies could all help to overcome these obstacles. Every dental surgeon should make a contribution to the cause about this shift in the Indian population's behaviour.


2021 ◽  
Vol 21 (1) ◽  
Author(s):  
Jon Ivar Elstad ◽  
Mia Vabø

Abstract Background Recruiting and retaining staff are standing challenges in eldercare. Low pay, difficult working conditions, and social relations at the workplace impact on turnover intentions. Few studies have used quantitative data for estimating the role of recognition by the wider society for staff instability. This study examines how perceived lack of recognition at the societal level affects Nordic eldercare workers’ considerations of leaving their jobs. Methods The 2015 Nordcare survey among frontline eldercare workers in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden (N = 3,677) is analysed. Issues such as working conditions, financial strain, work-life balance, and appreciation by care recipients and colleagues, were covered. Recognition at the societal level was measured by perceptions of being valued by top municipal leaders, mass media, and the general public. Analyses are made with cross-tabulations and multivariate linear probability regression models. Results In the total sample, 41.1 % had “seriously considered to quit during the last 12 months”. About one third felt “not at all valued” by top municipal leaders, while one fourth felt “not at all valued” by mass media. In bivariate analyses, perceptions of recognition were strongly associated with considerations to quit. These associations were reduced, but remained sizeable and highly significant in multivariate analyses adjusted for age, gender, health, working conditions, financial stress, workplace relations, and other known turnover predictors. Conclusions Lack of recognition by societal agents such as top municipal leaders, mass media, and the general public, is widely felt by Nordic eldercare workers. Feeling poorly valued by such sources is associated with frequent considerations to leave one’s employment. Perceived lack of recognition by the wider society has a significant and independent impact on staff instability in the eldercare sector. Societies’ recognition order is embedded in social structures which are resistant to change, but policies which succeed in raising the societal recognition of eldercare work may contribute to reduced retention difficulties in eldercare.


2021 ◽  
Vol 64 (8) ◽  
pp. 36-38
Author(s):  
Carlo Ghezzi
Keyword(s):  

Recent experiences toward communicating science to the general public.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Adrian Guta ◽  
Carol Strike ◽  
Sarah Flicker ◽  
Stuart J Murray ◽  
Ross Upshur ◽  
...  

The “general public” and specific “communities” are increasingly being integrated into scientific decision-making. This shift emphasizes “scientific citizenship” and collaboration between interdisciplinary scientists, lay people, and multi-sector stakeholders (universities, healthcare, and government). The objective of this paper is to problematize these developments through a theoretically informed reading of empirical data that describes the consequences of bringing together actors in the Canadian HIV community-based research (CBR) movement. Drawing on Foucauldian “governmentality” the complex inner workings of the impetus to conduct collaborative research are explored. The analysis offered surfaces the ways in which a formalized approach to CBR, as promoted through state funding mechanisms, determines the structure and limits of engagement while simultaneously reinforcing the need for finer grained knowledge about marginalized communities. Here, discourses about risk merge with notions of “scientific citizenship” to implicate both researchers and communities in a process of governance.


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Adrian Guta ◽  
Carol Strike ◽  
Sarah Flicker ◽  
Stuart J Murray ◽  
Ross Upshur ◽  
...  

The “general public” and specific “communities” are increasingly being integrated into scientific decision-making. This shift emphasizes “scientific citizenship” and collaboration between interdisciplinary scientists, lay people, and multi-sector stakeholders (universities, healthcare, and government). The objective of this paper is to problematize these developments through a theoretically informed reading of empirical data that describes the consequences of bringing together actors in the Canadian HIV community-based research (CBR) movement. Drawing on Foucauldian “governmentality” the complex inner workings of the impetus to conduct collaborative research are explored. The analysis offered surfaces the ways in which a formalized approach to CBR, as promoted through state funding mechanisms, determines the structure and limits of engagement while simultaneously reinforcing the need for finer grained knowledge about marginalized communities. Here, discourses about risk merge with notions of “scientific citizenship” to implicate both researchers and communities in a process of governance.


2021 ◽  
Vol 8 ◽  
Author(s):  
Alan F. T. Winfield ◽  
Serena Booth ◽  
Louise A. Dennis ◽  
Takashi Egawa ◽  
Helen Hastie ◽  
...  

This paper describes IEEE P7001, a new draft standard on transparency of autonomous systems1. In the paper, we outline the development and structure of the draft standard. We present the rationale for transparency as a measurable, testable property. We outline five stakeholder groups: users, the general public and bystanders, safety certification agencies, incident/accident investigators and lawyers/expert witnesses, and explain the thinking behind the normative definitions of “levels” of transparency for each stakeholder group in P7001. The paper illustrates the application of P7001 through worked examples of both specification and assessment of fictional autonomous systems.


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