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Literature ◽  
2021 ◽  
Vol 1 (1) ◽  
pp. 24-40
Author(s):  
Shailendra Kumar ◽  
Sanghamitra Choudhury

This manuscript aims to provide a nuanced study of the idea of rights and duties prevalent in ancient Védic society through Védic literature and Dharmaśāstras. This manuscript delves into the exegesis of the Védas and Dharmaśāstras to accomplish this. The archaic Védic literature and Dharmaśāstra texts are the origin and backbone of Sanskrit literature. They have a plethora of ideas that, if accepted, could be quite useful for the protection of any person’s human rights. In the Védas and Dharmaśāstras, rights and duties complement each other, and rights are integrated with duties. According to these texts, rights and duties are correlated and the relationship between rights and duties leads to the core concept of dhárma (constitutional laws). Dhárma is a systematic Sanskrit concept that includes traditions, obligations, morals, laws, order, and justice. It was a unique concept of dhárma that kept checks and balances on sovereign officials and prevented them from becoming autocratic and anarchist. It also provided the common man with a protective shield against the dictatorship of sovereign officials. Ordinary citizens had more privileges and fewer responsibilities relative to the state’s highest officials. The greater the authority, the less his privileges were, and the more extensive his responsibilities became. This research is an exegetical analysis of ancient Indian Védic and later Védic literature and is primarily aimed at deciphering some of the essential ideas about rights found in these texts, which are akin to contemporary human rights. It endeavours to discern and explain the tenets of human rights obnubilated in the pristine mantras of the ancient Védic and Smṛti texts of India. The essay further attempts to add a much-needed non-western perspective to the historiography of human rights.


Author(s):  
Shailendra Kumar ◽  
Sanghamitra Choudhury

This manuscript aims to provide a nuanced study of the idea of rights and duties prevalent in ancient Vedic society through Vedic literature and Dharmaśāstras . This manuscript delves into the exegesis of the Védas and Dharmaśāstras to accomplish this. The archaic Vedic literature and Dharmaśāstra texts are the origin and backbone of Sanskrit literature. They have a plethora of ideas that, if accepted, could be quite useful for the protection of any person's human rights. In Védas and Dharmaśāstras, rights and duties complement each other, and rights are integrated by duties. According to these texts, rights and duties are correlated and the relationship between rights and duties leads to the core concept of dharma (constitutional laws). Dharma is a systematic Sanskrit concept that includes traditions, obligation, morals, laws, order, and justice. It was a unique concept of dharma that kept checks and balances on sovereign officials and prevented them from becoming autocratic and anarchist. It also provided the common man with a protective shield against the dictatorship of sovereign officials. Ordinary citizens had more privileges and fewer responsibilities relative to the state's highest officials. The greater the authority, the less his privileges were, and the more extensive his responsibilities became. This research is an exegetical analysis of ancient Indian Vedic and later Vedic literature and is primarily aimed at deciphering some of the essential ideas of the rights found in these texts, which are akin to contemporary human rights. It endeavours to discern and explain the tenets of human rights obnubilated in the pristine mantras of Antediluvian Vedic and Smṛti texts of India. The essay further attempts to add a much needed non-western perspective to the historiography of human rights.


Author(s):  
Shailendra Kumar ◽  
Sanghamitra Choudhury

This manuscript aims to provide a nuanced study of the idea of rights and duties prevalent in ancient Vedic society through Vedic literature and Dharmaśāstras . This manuscript delves into the exegesis of the Védas and Dharmaśāstras to accomplish this. The archaic Vedic literature and Dharmaśāstra texts are the origin and backbone of Sanskrit literature. They have a plethora of ideas that, if accepted, could be quite useful for the protection of any person's human rights. In Védas and Dharmaśāstras, rights and duties complement each other, and rights are integrated by duties. According to these texts, rights and duties are correlated and the relationship between rights and duties leads to the core concept of dharma (constitutional laws). Dharma is a systematic Sanskrit concept that includes traditions, obligation, morals, laws, order, and justice. It was a unique concept of dharma that kept checks and balances on sovereign officials and prevented them from becoming autocratic and anarchist. It also provided the common man with a protective shield against the dictatorship of sovereign officials. Ordinary citizens had more privileges and fewer responsibilities relative to the state's highest officials. The greater the authority, the less his privileges were, and the more extensive his responsibilities became. This research is an exegetical analysis of ancient Indian Vedic and later Vedic literature and is primarily aimed at deciphering some of the essential ideas of the rights found in these texts, which are akin to contemporary human rights. It endeavours to discern and explain the tenets of human rights obnubilated in the pristine mantras of Antediluvian Vedic and Smṛti texts of India. The essay further attempts to add a much needed non-western perspective to the historiography of human rights.


2021 ◽  
Vol 9 (7) ◽  
pp. 1398-1403
Author(s):  
Neha Prajapati ◽  
Amit Mishra ◽  
Mita Kotecha

Ayurveda medicine exists on the planet for the benefit of humanity. Ayurveda's value is in its ability to maintain individual health and treat a patient's condition. Following the daily routine, seasonal regimen, codes for healthy behaviour, ethical regimen, and so on, one can obtain good health. Plants are the foundation of Ayurveda, an an- cient Indian system of holistic treatment. Mustaka (Cyperus rotundus Linn) is described as ‘Kyambu’ in the Vedic literature, its synonyms like ‘Gundra & Gangeyam’ denotes the hydrophytic nature of this plant. Mustaka can be used to treat a variety of ailments. It is a significant herbal medication that may be utilised in a variety of ways to treat a variety of illnesses, mostly in the Kapha-Pitta dosha. Acharya Charaka has emphasised that each sub- stance on the earth is useful in combating illness when applied with planning and for a specific purpose. Keywords: Ayurveda, Mustaka, Kyambu, Kapha, Pitta.


Author(s):  
Sharmah Gargee

The Goddess cult had influenced the socio-religious history of early Assam. Assam was under the influence of Tantra before the Puranic tradition reached the region. Female divinities occupied topmost position in Tantricism. Goddess is central to most of the religious beliefs in ancient Assam, specifically among the local tribal cult. Though the early Vedic literature seldom discussed about the female divinities, the author of the Puranas in later period tried to incorporate the regional goddesses to Puranic literature due to their popularity among the local people. The authors of the Puranas tried to spread Brahmonical social order and therefore choose the popular goddesses. Some Mahapuranas and Upa-Puranas richly equipped with Mother cult. This paper intends to discuss the status of some Puranic goddesses of early Assam with the help of sculptural evidences. Keywords: Goddess, Mahapurana, Upa-Purana, Sculpture, Tantra, Mother cult, Vedic literature


2021 ◽  
Author(s):  
Ni KadekSurpi

Literacy is the soul of education in Hindu civilization. The Upanisad is an integral part of Vedic literature, and it provides the basic concepts of education and literacy patterns. According to the Upanisad, education is about giving academic degrees to students and building excellent human character; literacy is essential in Hindu Education. Various educational methods are used in the Upanisad, with the aim of awakening all human potential. Through educational efforts to generate superior human character as a whole, intelligence and wisdom are accentuated. Upanisad learning still has relevance in the modern era, such as in the philosophy of idealism. Students must be made aware of the importance of education in life, outside of simply making a living. The spirit of the learning torch must be adopted in modern times to prevent it from losing sight of its main path, that is, to raise human excellence. Hindu literacy becomes the main foundation in the education system, which builds the machine of human intelligence and wisdom. Activating the spirit of learning and methodology in Upanisad will directly help efforts to increase literacy. Keywords: upanisad, vedānta, Hindu literacy


2021 ◽  
Vol 12 (2) ◽  
pp. 243-246
Author(s):  
Durgesh Kumar ◽  
Parikshit Shirode

Kshara is mentioned only in post-Vedic literature. Whilst Charaka Samhita applies only to Detailed description of its preparation, classification, indication and description for Kshara In Susruta Samhita, contraindications are available. Kshara is defined as one of the Upayantras or AnuSastras. It is a medicine, prepared out of the dried plants water soluble ashes by a special process known as Kshara kalpana.It is considered to be between Shashtra and Pradhan because of its Chedana, Bhedana, Lekhana and, Anushashtra Karma, as it is said, to be Tridoshaghna and for special techniques to be used. Susruta has characterised"TatraKsharanatKshananadva Kshara" The medication has distinctive Ksharan or Kshanan properties. Ksharan, meaning either good or unhealthy, kills fleshy mass. Paneeya Kshara is indicated in good number of diseases by ancient Acharyas. Tilanal Paneeya kshara is mentation in Rasatarangini and used in various diseases.


2021 ◽  
Vol 9 (5) ◽  
pp. 240-249
Author(s):  
Y. V. Subba Rao

Vedic Paradigm is a survey of Vedic literature of ‘Para Vidya’ of the unlimited realm of transcendental knowledge besides ‘Apara Vidya’ knowledge of material sciences has stupendous knowledge of science latent in them. Instead of exploring the science latent in the vedic literature by scientific management, Indian academics in support with some more from other countries together chose to nomenclature the rich heritage of ancient Hindu wisdom as “Nationalistic Pseudoscience”. The present study disproved this unwarranted criticism. ‘Jyotish’, one of the six Vedangas and ancillary of the four Vedas since antiquity, taken here in this paper as one example as an embodiment of all modern sciences latent.‘Jyotish’ is defined as the study of the effect of Astrophysics on the earth and all life living on it affording a clue to birth, death, rebirth and liberation of soul while affording proof that the entire subject together with the genesis of its principles is based on sunlight, the electromagnetic wave of light and radiation characterized by frequency or wavelength of oscillations.


Author(s):  
SAYALI PATIL SANTOSH PATIL

Ayurveda is regarded as one of the ancient most science which is having it’s root of origin in vedic literature. In vedic period, the teaching and learning were dependant on Guru Shishya Parampara were-in the knowledge was given by the teachers to the disciples direcly by speech. The literatures were made easy to understand with help of describing and comparing the principles with examples such as exemplifications. Exemplification means giving specific, vivid examples for the purpose of adding more information to explain, define and illustrate a general idea and to elaborate the main idea. Exemplification make the literature easy to understand and it plays a very important role in learning and teaching in Ayurvedic Samhitas. In Ayurved exemplification is called as Drushtanta. Drushtanta is a part of Tantrayukti. Tantrayukti means a logical compilation of a text. Tantrayukti is very essential to understand the science in correct way. Better understanding of Shastra is only possible with the knowledge of Tantrayukti. It provides knowledge of writing techniques, explains hidden meaning. Sushruta-Samhita is not merely a surgical text. It is a comprehensive encyclopedic work on Ayurveda as a whole including its fundamental principles  This article will help readers to know more about Drushtanta and it’s application in Sushrut Samhita.    


AYUSHDHARA ◽  
2021 ◽  
pp. 3084-3090
Author(s):  
Sukanya.V.S ◽  
Haroon Irshad ◽  
Leena P Nair

Objective: To assess the fundamental concept of Ayurveda explained in Charaka Samhita by the learning methods of Chathushka. Review Methods: Literary review methods were followed throughout the study. Mainly focussed on Charaka Samhita and its Commentaries, Articles related to Chatushka Methodology. Result and Conclusion: Ayurveda is the Upaveda of Atharva Veda and consists of Brihatrayees and Laghutrayess. They have their own textual version that follows a particular style of writing as suited to the subject. The term “Samhita'' denotes complete collection of specific valuable knowledge unavoidable for the improvement of various aspects of life. Since the Vedic literature, the word Samhita is in use. Similarly the main aim of Ayurveda is to protect all aspects of life, so got the name Samhita. Among the Samhitas, Charaka Samhita is divided into eight Sthana and embodiments of knowledge to promote positive health. In Charaka Samhita, Acharya ratified various techniques like Thantrayukti, Vadamarga etc., by adopting a unique methodology known as Chathushka Methodology. Sutra Sthana consists of thirty chapters partitioned into seven quadrants. Each quadrant deals with specific subjects. This paper highlights the influence of Chathushka methodology in identifying the pedagogy of Charaka Samhita to understand the fundamentals of Ayurveda. Data Source: This is a review article and main source of the article is Charaka Samhitha and its commentaries which were available. The main source of Charaka Samhita is the online e - Samhitha of National Institute of Indian Medical Heritage.


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